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Application Related Standards: Valves, Rebar, Springs, Fasteners, Pressure Vessels etc.

Chemical composition of valve steels to BS EN 10090

BS EN 10090 is the material standard for valve steels and alloys. Martensitic and austenitic steels are included. Most of these grades can also be classed as stainless steels by the definition given in BS EN 10088-1, which considers steels with minimum chromium (Cr) contents of 11.5% and maximum carbon (C) contents of 1.2% to be stainless steels. In BS EN 10088 however the primary purpose of the alloys is corrosion resistance, whereas in BS EN 10090 the elevated temperature strength and oxidation resistance are the main properties required of the steels listed here, in their intended applications.

Chemical compositions of ACI stainless and heat resisting steel castings grades

ASTM standards A297, A351, A743, A744 and A890 specify castings for corrosion and heat-resisting service. The grade designations used in these standards are those originally developed by the ACI, the Alloy Casting Institute. (Now the Steel Founder's Society of America). These standards include the 'C' grades for aqueous (wet) corrosion service at temperatures up to 650 C and the 'H' grades for high temperature service at temperatures generally over 600 C. The range of steels listed in this article includes martensitic, ferritic, precipitation hardening, austenitic and austenitic-ferritic (duplex) steel grades and some nickel based alloys. Where appropriate, the nearest or related wrought grade is shown in the table.

Ambient temperature mechanical properties of stainless steels to BS EN 10269

BS EN 10269 is the material standard for stainless and heat-resisting steels, a selection of low alloy steels and some nickel alloys for fasteners. The ambient temperature mechanical properties shown in this article include 0.2% proof strength, tensile strength, elongation, reduction in area and impact (charpy) strength in the finally heat treated condition. Specified hardness levels for the steels for subsequent quenching and tempering (1.4923 1.4938 and 1.4913) in their delivery condition are also included in a separate table. The final heat treatment conditions for each grade are also tabulated.

Chemical composition and mechanical properties of stainless steels to BS 6744

BS 6744 Stainless steel bars for the reinforcement of and use in concrete was last published in 2009. This version is substantially the same as the 2001 edition but with the addition of 2 lean duplex steels 1.4162 and 1.4362.  These steels have the benefit of having a lower nickel content than the standard austenitic grades such as 1.4301 and 1.4401. They are therefore less prone to large variations in price.

BS 6744 2016 (May) Update - Stainless Steel Bars, Reinforcement of Concrete

This European Standard specifies the requirements and test methods for solid stainless steel bars used for the reinforcement of concrete. It is applicable to ribbed stainless steel bars in grade 500. Several significant changes have been made to the earlier standard version i.e. BS6744:2001 + A2:2009, ‘Stainless steel bars for the reinforcement of and use in concrete – Requirements and test methods’ and these include:

Stainless Steel BSENISO 3506 Fastener Grades A1, A2, (A3), & A4 (A5)

BSENISO 3506 replaces BS6105. Part 1 covers bolts, screw and studs, part 2 nuts and part 4 tapping screws. The chemical compositions are common to the various parts. Austenitic grades A1 A2 and A4 are shown and compared to bar grades 303 304 349S17 316 and 394S17. Mechanical properties for property class 50 70 and 80 austenitic bolts and studs and property class 20H 25H 30H and 40H tapping screws are tabulated and the fastener designations, such as A2-70 and A4-25H described. Duplex FA (ferritic-austenitic similar to 1.4462 (2205) of EN 10088-1) is a likely future grade for inclusion in the standard. Fastener grade selection is covered in annexes to the standards. The standards lists grades 1.4439 1.4539 (904L) 1.4529 (6% molybdenum austenitic) and 1.4462 (2205) as suitable for reducing the risk of chloride induced stress corrosion cracking failures in applications such as indoor swimming pools.

Specifying stainless steel for spring applications

European standards now cover both strip and wire products for springs. BSEN 10151:2002 applies to strip and replaces BS5770 part 4:1981, which is now withdrawn. BSEN 10272-3:2001 applies to wire and replaces BS2056:1981. Both standards use the European steel grade number system, most of which are also shown in BSEN 10088-1

Stainless steel fasteners

Stainless steel fasteners are specified to BS EN ISO 3506. Part 1 covers bolts, screws and studs. Part 2 covers nuts. These specifications replace BS 6105. The latest edition was issued in 2009.

Tightening torques for stainless steel bolts

Minimum breaking torque (M b,min) for austenitic grade bolts and screws between M 1.6 and M 16 (course threads) are shown in table 4 of BSENISO 3506-1:1997. This shows torque values in Nm for property classes 50, 70 and 80 as shown in the table below. This applies to 'grades' A1, A2, A3, A4 and A5. Tightening torque values are not given in this standard.

British and american standards for stainless steels for pressure vessel applications

The table shows both current and obsolete British standards (where these may be of current interest) in the 'Status' column. 'C' is current and 'W' is withdrawn. The 'date' is the original publication year.

Elevated and sub-zero temperature mechanical properties of stainless steels to BS EN 10269

BS EN 10269 is the material standard for stainless and heat-resisting steels, a selection of low alloy steels and some nickel alloys for fasteners. The elevated and sub-zero temperature mechanical properties shown in this article include 0.2% proof and tensile strengths and impact (charpy) strength in the finally heat treated condition. The final heat treatment conditions for each grade are also tabulated.

Chemical compositions of stainless steels to BS EN 10269

BS EN 10269 is the material standard for stainless and heat-resisting steels, a selection of low alloy steels and some nickel alloys for fasteners. The standard includes some elevated and sub-zero temperature mechanical properties and can be used for specifying fasteners for pressure purposes. Austenitic, martensitic and precipitation hardening stainless grades are included. Only the chemical composition of the stainless steels in the standard are listed in this article.

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